Court acquittals in 2013 decrease by almost 60 percent compared to 2012

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The number of court acquittals in Georgia decreased by 58.9% in 2013 as compared to the previous year.

According to the data of the Supreme Court of Georgia, the total of 1,813 cases involving 2,206 accused persons were heard on the merits by lower courts in 2013. Of them 70 persons were fully acquitted in 37 cases and 50 persons were partially acquitted in 42 cases. The verdicts of not guilty comprised 2% of all the cases heard on the merits in 2013, compared to the corresponding indicator of 7.8% in 2012. Out of 1,149 cases with 1,406 accused persons, which were heard on the merits in 2012, courts delivered 90 verdicts of not guilty towards 117 persons. The number of cases on which verdicts of not guilty were delivered was less by 53 cases in 2013 than in 2012, which makes up 58.9%.

The indicator of partial acquittal was twice as many in 2013 as in 2012. In 2013, some 50 persons accused in 42 cases were partially acquitted whilst in 2012 in 14 cases.

Moreover, the number of cases terminated during the trial in 2013 exceeded that in 2012 by 5.6 times. In 2013, some 357 cases were terminated which comprises 19.7% of the trials on the merits, whilst in 2012, the corresponding indicators stood at 54 cases and 4.7%, respectively.

It is worth noting that in parallel with the decrease in acquittals, the number of cases heard in courts increased in 2013. According to the data of the Supreme Court of Georgia, the number of cases heard by lower courts in 2013 exceeded that in 2012 by 51.3%. In particular, in 2013, courts heard 13,794 cases (with 15,901 accused persons) while in 2012 courts heard 9,120 cases (11,211 persons). Out of heard cases, courts ruled on 13,314 cases, which exceeded the indicator of the previous year by 48.1% (4,197 cases).

Moreover, courts approved plea bargaining in 11,858 cases in 2013, which comprised 89.1% of the total number of delivered verdicts. The corresponding indicator in 2012 stood at 87.8% (7,897 cases).

 

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